Clinton Rowe

Professor

Ph.D., 1988, Delaware

Land-atmosphere interactions, Boundary layer dynamics, Mesoscale processes, Climate modeling, Paleoclimatology

Contact Information

305 Bessey Hall
402-472-1946
crowe1@unl.edu

My major research area is in physical meteorology and climatology, specifically the fluxes of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary layer. Much of my research has focused on radiative fluxes between vegetated surfaces and the atmosphere, but I have also conducted modeling and field studies investigating energy exchanges over the Greenland ice sheet and their impact on the amount and extent of surface melting. I am currently involved in several research projects concerning land surface-atmosphere interactions in the Nebraska Sand Hills. One of these is investigating how the Sand Hills' unique soil properties affect generation of warm-season mesoscale precipitation over the Sand Hills and surrounding plains. Our findings show that the Sand Hills have a complex set of effects on the atmosphere — in some cases acting to inhibit convective precipitation while in others acting to enhance convection and precipitation generation in the region. These investigations were part of a large, multi-investigator NSF grant to study the Sand Hills as a complex ecosystem. This team of researchers included ecologists, physicists, geologists, hydrologists and meteorologists.

I am also working with Dave Loope and Bob Oglesby to model the climate of Pangea during the Jurassic. We are using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Simulation Model (CCSM) to simulate the climate of 200 million years ago as part of our research into the environment that led to development of vast eolian formations in what is now the southwestern United States.

I teach courses in physical meteorology as well as graduate seminars in boundary-layer meteorology, climatic change and other topics in meteorology and climatology. In addition, I supervise all Meteorology/Climatology internships.

Selected Publications


  • Feng, S., Oglesby, R.J., Rowe, C.M., Loope, D.B., and Hu, Q., 2008, Atlantic and Pacific SST influences on Medieval drought in North America simulated by the Community Atmospheric Model, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D11101, doi:10.1029/2007JD009347.

  • Radell, D.B. and Rowe, C.M., 2008, An observational analysis and evaluation of land surface model accuracy in the Nebraska Sand Hills, J. Hydrometeorology, 9, 601-621, doi:10.1175/2007JHM913.1.

  • Rowe, C.M., Loope, D.B., Oglesby, R.J., Van der Voo, R. and Broadwater, C.E., 2007, Inconsistencies between Pangean reconstructions and basic climate controls, Science, 318, 1284-1286.

  • Sridhar, V., Loope, D.B., Swinehart, J.B., Mason, J.A., Oglesby, R.J., and Rowe, C.M., 2006, Large Wind Shift on the Great Plains during the Medieval Warm Period, Science, 313, 345-347.

  • Chen, X., Chen, X.H., Rowe, C., Hu, Q. and M. Anderson, 2003, Geological and climatic controls on streamflows in the Nebraska Sand Hills, Journal of American Water Resources Association, 39, 217-228.

  • Loope, D.B. and Rowe, C.M., 2003, Long-lived pluvial episodes during deposition of the Navajo Sandstone, Journal of Geology, 111, 223-232.

  • Loope, D.B., Steiner, M.B., Rowe, C.M. and Lancaster, N., 2003, Tropical westerlies over Pangean sand seas, Sedimentology, 51, 315-322.

  • Rowe, C.M., Anderson, M.R., Kaiser, J., and Radell, D., 2002, Warm-season land-atmosphere interactions in the Nebraska Sand Hills, Sixteenth Conference on Hydrology, American Meteorological Society, J71-J74.

  • Loope, D.B., Rowe, C.M., and Joeckel, R.M., 2001, Annual monsoon rains recorded by Jurassic dunes, Nature, 412(6842), 64-66.

  • Mote, T.L., and Rowe, C.M., 1996, A comparison of microwave radiometric data and modeled snowpack conditions for Dye 2, Greenland, Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics, 59, 245-256.

  • Rowe, C.M., 1993, Incorporating landscape heterogeneity in land surface albedo models, Journal of Geophysical Research (Atmospheres), 98(D3), 5037-5043.